Fruits

Released in 1960, Boyne raspberry is an early-season variety that is extremely winter hardy. It consistently produces deep-red, medium-sized berries. The medium sweet, aromatic flavor makes it great for freezing and jam. It will grow where other varieties experience winter injury damage to the canes.
...
...
...

Longtime proven favorite! Succulent, large, dark-red fruit. Heavy cropper. Firm berries, easy to pick and carry. Strong, sturdy canes. Regular cane.

All "bare root" nursery stock (wrapped in cedar shavings) must be soaked for a minumum of 24 hours upon arrival.

Please DO NOT soak "seedling plugs" which are all-ready growing in soil, these should just be watered and transplanted directly into the garden.

Please make sure to read the plant label, it tells you how to handle it!

  • Separate cedar packing material from roots and discard, it should not go into planting hole.
  • Young trees need ample water to establish, generous waterings 2 times a week for the first two months, three if conditions are very dry.
  • Always dig hole large enough so that roots are spread out evenly.
  • Plant about 1-2 inches lower than old soil mark on tree or shrub.
  • Never let exposed roots dry out in sun or wind.
  • Apply a feeding of Peter's Plumper Upper Fertilizer after initial planting, then every 2-3 weeks after that until late August.
  • If you are unable to plant right away, make sure roots are soaking in water and in a cool place.
  • On any grafted stock, make sure you cut off any suckers (branches from below graft) that start growing. These occur most often on Apple trees, plums and Roses.
 

Prune to get the desired shape and height or to check vigorous growth. On spring flowering shrubs, pruning should take place after flowering is completed. Non-flowering shrubs should be pruned during dormant period. On older shrubs it is advisable to cut back the older stems to ground level, while cutting the younger more vigorous stems to half their height. In the case of new shrubs, it is sometimes helpful to prune back the top third after planting, this gives the shrubs roots a better start as they have less to feed and thus can root quicker.

We store all our nursery stock in temperature controlled coolers right up until we ship. When you receive your stock it will just be starting to break dormancy. Soaking of stock is essential in getting the stock off to a good start. In some cases stock may be slow to leaf out. If this happens prune back tree or shrub by 1/3 and water heavily for 10 days. This will encourage stock to root and break dormancy.

Like full sun and a moist rich soil. Grow in rows, spacing the plants 45 cm (18 in) apart and keep the rows 1 m (3.2 ft) or more apart. After planting, prune the plants back to 15-20 cm (6-8 in) in height to encourage better root development and the production of new canes. Keep soil mulched to help retain moisture. They require lots of water, especially at harvest time. More you water, the better the berries and yield will be. Prune fruiting canes down to the ground after they have finished bearing for the year. In spring, thin canes to about 15-20 cm (6-8 in) apart. Retain only new strong healthy canes that show little or no winter injury. Everbearing varities may be pruned right down to ground level in late fall or early spring, before new growth starts. Another tip on the Everbearing type is prune half of your canes to the ground and the other half, do not prune at all--this will split your crop. Then following do the reverse to your canes. Great way to spread out your harvest!

Organic Food

We are All Natural!

specializing in natural products & services.

Contacts

  Email us: office@gridfree.ca

  +204.510.4187

  

   Riding Mountain Mb

Follow us